Posts Tagged ‘Agriculture’

Ken Meter: Building A Local Food Economy

June 23, 2009

As the pendulum has swung toward a globalized economy, more people are realizing the huge costs associated with the singular pursuit of maximizing profit, employing cheap labor, and ignoring environmental concerns. A shift is underway to promote sustainable local economies, in part, a necessary response to increased fuel costs, and global warming threats. Creating a local food economy means valuing the production of healthy foods, creating sustainable markets for farmers who produce the food, and livable wages for farm workers who toil in their fields. In part 1, Ken Meter, of Crossroads Resource Center, defines a strong food system, and why its so important.

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Edible City – trailer

June 21, 2009

Edible City is a documentary film that explores the issues of food justice, security, and sovereignty through a comprehensive view of urban farming in the Bay Area a grassroots effort that sees people responding to climate change, rising food costs and gas prices, and increasing health concerns by strengthening connections to the food they eat and reaching out to their local communities.

Catastrophic Fall in 2009 Global Food Production

February 16, 2009

by Eric deCarbonnel

After reading about the droughts in two major agricultural countries, China and Argentina, I decided to research the extent other food producing nations were also experiencing droughts. This project ended up taking a lot longer than I thought. 2009 looks to be a humanitarian disaster around much of the world

To understand the depth of the food Catastrophe that faces the world this year, consider the graphic below depicting countries by USD value of their agricultural output, as of 2006.

Now, consider the same graphic with the countries experiencing droughts highlighted.

The countries that make up two thirds of the world’s agricultural output are experiencing drought conditions. Whether you watch a video of the drought in China, Australia, Africa, South America, or the US , the scene will be the same: misery, ruined crop, and dying cattle.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=12252


Farmer in Chief, by Michael Pollan

October 21, 2008

Thursday 09 October 2008

by: Michael Pollan, The New York Times

http://www.truthout.org/101708EA

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Dear Mr. President-Elect,

It may surprise you to learn that among the issues that will occupy much of your time in the coming years is one you barely mentioned during the campaign: food. Food policy is not something American presidents have had to give much thought to, at least since the Nixon administration – the last time high food prices presented a serious political peril. Since then, federal policies to promote maximum production of the commodity crops (corn, soybeans, wheat and rice) from which most of our supermarket foods are derived have succeeded impressively in keeping prices low and food more or less off the national political agenda. But with a suddenness that has taken us all by surprise, the era of cheap and abundant food appears to be drawing to a close. What this means is that you, like so many other leaders through history, will find yourself confronting the fact – so easy to overlook these past few years – that the health of a nation’s food system is a critical issue of national security. Food is about to demand your attention.

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