The Politics Of Protest and Individualism

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Survival Acres is the most fearless blogger around.

JGrace

Me!

http://survivalacres.com/wordpress/?p=1666

If you’re going to stage effective protest (versus protests), I guarantee you, it’s going to cost you something — personally. And this is where so many Americans fail, they want group “cooperation” as a necessity for their involvement, where they can link hands around a tree or something, otherwise, they won’t do it or they won’t commit. They’re not willing to put a personal aspect to protest, where it will cost them something personally.

Of course, this means that such protests are absolutely meaningless and ineffective. What do our leaders care when we publically protests with signs and placards and letter writing campaigns, but then go right back to compliance or cooperation or funding after our weekend spree of “disobedience”? If you’re going to protest, you have to commit your life to the effort, not just your mouth.

Our leaders have long recognized this tendency and have used it effectively for their own advantage and agenda. Group participation is highly manipulated in this country (and probably elsewhere too) as being socially acceptable. Non-group participation is widely frowned upon as being “anti-social”. We’re taught this behavior from birth, never realizing that we are unwittingly going along with the mass brainwash of herd manipulation.

Haven’t you noticed that group participation is allowed, whereas individual protests is not? I’ve read countless stories where the isolated individual who stands out is swiftly silenced. Ever wonder why? Because this frightens the living hell out of those who are trying to manipulate us into compliance. While America prides itself on “individualism”, the truth is another story. We’re a nation of herd animals, the vast majority unwilling to take a stand on anything, especially if they have to stand out and be identified.

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